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Battlefield low FPS

Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
30
hi there :)
I have an m14x r2 with a 2.3ghz i7, 8 gb of ram and 2gb nvidia gt650m
I play maxed on every game I installed (crysis 2, borderlands 2, NFS MW ecc) but when I start playing battlefield the game starts to lag or works "less better" than the others and i can't really get why...
please help :)
 

MattyB

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Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
2,905
BF3 will seriously tax GPU's. Have you tried bringing the settings down a bit and turning off AA? I found that reducing the settings on BF3 didn't really make it look that much worse but it helped the performance.

Make sure you're Nvidia driver is a recent one too. BF3 was not good on the Dell version of the Nvidia driver when I started playing it. Make sure you get it straight from Nvidia.
 

yikes81

Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2012
Messages
1,539
I find that i can keep the settings on high if i reduce the resolution.
Dropping it a couple of bars down should put a little less strain on the GPU.

Other than that, I found the latest version of Nvidia drivers not the greatest. I rolled back one version and all was ok.
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
30
R: Battlefield low FPS

Thanks a lot
I will downgrade the graphics settings in the Game
Quite annoyed that my m14x istruzioni not able to fully support battlefield. ..

Inviato dal mio GT-I9300 con Tapatalk 2
 

grouchomarxx

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2013
Messages
7
It's not that your laptop doesn't "support" the game, AA (anti aliasing) since it's inception has been the killer of performance. Even high-end machines will drop in frame rate if to many settings have been turned off. A good way to prevent performance lowering settings is to know which settings affect games more the others. From my 15 years of experience of gaming and being in the computer performance world I have found the following settings are almost always responsible for low frame rates.

Lower Frame Rates
1. Anti Aliasing
2. Post processing effects (HDR rendering, bloom (not so much anymore), per vertex lighting)
3. High quality shadows (can makes certain games unplayable if set to high)
4. Vertical Sync (throws away partially rendered frames to eliminate page tearing, only good if you computer can render a consistent 60+ fps which is the RR of most monitors)
5. View distance (especially if you have AA, post processing or HQ shadows turned on)



Things you can crank and will have little to no effect on performance
1. Texture quality
2. Anisotropic filtering
3. Decal quality and quantity (provided you have a GPU with a good amount of memory)
4. Radial Blur or Depth of Field.

I hope this helps. When I play a new game such as Batman: Arkham City I begin by setting texture settings high and resolution to my native 1080P then play. If the frame rate is good I slowly start changing settings such as AA and light/shadow settings up until the frame rate begins to drop then I stop. That way that game looks as good as it can without having to sacrifice frame rate (playability).

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

Kloaked

Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
6
On my experience with BF3 on my M14X, I can play on High settings on most maps, but on more 'graphical' maps with dust in the air and such (I can never remember map names) I have to turn down to Medium settings. The reason the performance is lacking with the machine is because of the GPU's capability, specifically the core clock speed. Grouchomarxx summed it up pretty well. With having too many settings up and then playing at high resolutions, the GPU will reach it's max potential and not be able to handle the settings at playable frame rates. That's the sad limitations of laptops. But hey, we look awesome while playing on them while we're on the go, eh? :]
 

MattyB

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Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
2,905
Agreed. Like I mentioned earlier, I don't see a significant difference when reducing the settings a little anyway.
 

propeldragon

Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2012
Messages
6
It's not that your laptop doesn't "support" the game, AA (anti aliasing) since it's inception has been the killer of performance. Even high-end machines will drop in frame rate if to many settings have been turned off. A good way to prevent performance lowering settings is to know which settings affect games more the others. From my 15 years of experience of gaming and being in the computer performance world I have found the following settings are almost always responsible for low frame rates.

Lower Frame Rates


1. Anti Aliasing
2. Post processing effects (HDR rendering, bloom (not so much anymore), per vertex lighting)
3. High quality shadows (can makes certain games unplayable if set to high)
4. Vertical Sync (throws away partially rendered frames to eliminate page tearing, only good if you computer can render a consistent 60+ fps which is the RR of most monitors)
5. View distance (especially if you have AA, post processing or HQ shadows turned on)



Things you can crank and will have little to no effect on performance
1. Texture quality
2. Anisotropic filtering
3. Decal quality and quantity (provided you have a GPU with a good amount of memory)
4. Radial Blur or Depth of Field.

I hope this helps. When I play a new game such as Batman: Arkham City I begin by setting texture settings high and resolution to my native 1080P then play. If the frame rate is good I slowly start changing settings such as AA and light/shadow settings up until the frame rate begins to drop then I stop. That way that game looks as good as it can without having to sacrifice frame rate (playability).

Hope this helps.

AA isnt the killer its msaa
 

grouchomarxx

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2013
Messages
7
Yeah, were I was saying the many settings of AA are performance killers, he chose to be specific, all forms of AA hinder performance, some more then others.
 

Sora3

Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2013
Messages
37
i was having similar problems but it turned out to be a hardware problem. :( returned it and am going to create a new one
 
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