Bricked M17x R4 after BIOS update

PliSsK

New Member
May 12, 2021
4
0
UK
I was updating the BIOS on my brother's M17x R4 as it was still on version A02, and when I got to A09 it bricked it. The machine responded to the power button being pressed with lights coming on but shut down after a few seconds. I read about a remedial procedure to reflash it from a USB stick, which wasn't described so accurately, so I did my best attempt and it totally bricked it so now the laptop is totally unresponsive to pressing the power button, with no lights coming on whatsoever, as if there was no power at all. The procedure I followed is below.

The BIOS update file was: M17R4A09WIN64.exe

Unzipping this reveals a number of files, however the only '.fd' extension file I could see was isflashWIN.fd'. I renamed this to M17R4.hdr, put it on a FAT32 USB stick, removed the battery and power cord, inserted the USB stick into the E-Sata slot, pressed the End key, reinserted power cord, and the machine's lights all came on and the fans were at full, and it stayed like this for a few minutes, then a bleeping started every second for a while and then a few minutes later a faster bleeping, for a minute, then the bleeping stopped and the machine continued with the lights on and fans at full so after a few more minutes I pulled the power cord out. I didn't think the update was working. However I later read in one post that it can take 10-15 minutes to complete.

I have since replaced the BIOS chip with one preprogrammed with A14 and it has not made any difference, the machine still shows no signs of life when pressing the power button, no lights at all. I used a heat gun to unseat the old chip and reseat the new chip. The new chip is in the same orientation as the old chip.

Any ideas what else it could be or do I need a new motherboard?

TIA
 

PliSsK

New Member
May 12, 2021
4
0
UK
I don't suppose you know whether a fried EC chip at U36 might explain it? Both chips are often mentioned by people who use a BIOS programmer, I wondered if both often go at the same time or something. The BIOS chip I replaced was at U48.
 

MattyB

Moderator
Mar 19, 2012
3,110
126
Adelaide, Australia
Couldn't say, sorry. That's beyond my experience. If you know someone who knows what they're doing then you may be able to find a board schematic and they can try to trace the failed component. For me it's cheaper to replace the board because sending the bad one to someone ends up costing more than a replacement.
 
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PliSsK

New Member
May 12, 2021
4
0
UK
Couldn't say, sorry. That's beyond my experience. If you know someone who knows what they're doing then you may be able to find a board schematic and they can try to trace the failed component. For me it's cheaper to replace the board because sending the bad one to someone ends up costing more than a replacement.
Thanks Matty. I've got schematics but have no idea what I'm doing. You are right, I had figured that any bios repair place spending time on it would cost as much as a new board so I may as well exhaust my options and then either break it for spares or buy a new board depending on which is more financially viable. I was hoping it might be something simple like the power button on psu lol but it's not likely given when the total death occurred.