Upgrade of M18 video cards to GTX780m

rabidstoat

New Member
Mar 18, 2014
1
0
UK
By luck I managed to get hold of an M18 and want to upgrade the GPUs (GTX770m to GTX780m) - luckily i'm not paying! However I'm looking for a "definitive" guide on doing this, in particular cooling. Does the vram need thermal pads or will thermal tape do? Any "gotchas" that i need to be aware of etc?

Any info greatly appreciated.
 

MattyB

Moderator
Mar 19, 2012
3,110
126
Adelaide, Australia
The cards should be very similar if not exactly the same. You should just need to swap the pads on the 770s to the 780s and get some good thermal paste for the chip.
I upgraded my M18x from 675s to 780s and the pad layout was identical.
Just make sure you get all the pads perfect. One false move can fry your mobo or GPU or both.
You can always get some extra pads off eBay just to be sure. A bit extra never hurts.
Nice to get two free 780Ms!
 

sway

Member
Apr 12, 2012
676
0
Houston
Matty , what thermal paste have you used ?
silver based , ceramic based ? or simple silicon based ?

Order some fujipoly extreme thermal pads, it's the best and makes a difference. For paste use gelid gc extreme, there's a whole list of tested paste, that was the best, I use it to.

If your brave and careful you can use coolaboratory ultra, but like matty said one false move and it'll fry since it's liquid metal. Maybe only a degrees or two from gelid though, not worth risking anything over.

tappin from the neXus 5
 
but like matty said one false move and it'll fry since it's liquid metal

i'm sorry , what ?
liquid metal ? what in the world is that made from ? quicksilver ? gallium ? indium ?
i think you mean it's silicon with molecular metal in suspension , like silver , iridium , palladium etc but i doubt it's real 100 % liquid metal .
NaK is a liquid metal , but it's very volatile in presence of steam/humidity/water , but it's used for industrial cooling fans , in closed environments .
i know there are gallium based alloys used for cooling (like nuclear reactors) or used in thermostats , but usually liquid metal is corrosive , and there are few metals that can withstand it ... so i doubt it has a direct application for computers .
for example , 1 " lucky " drop on the MB and it can corrode the MB and destroy circuits inside it , or short-circuit stuff on the surface of it .

you sure of what you're saying ? i need a link pls

as for thermal paste/compound ... i think it's safer , if someone is not using a metal-based compound (silicon and ceramic are the safest) .
for example Arctic Silver Céramique . i know i was using that a long time ago when i had a desktop, not sure it's still on the market . will check out the Gelid GC out of curiosity .
 

sway

Member
Apr 12, 2012
676
0
Houston
i'm sorry , what ?
liquid metal ? what in the world is that made from ? quicksilver ? gallium ? indium ?
i think you mean it's silicon with molecular metal in suspension , like silver , iridium , palladium etc but i doubt it's real 100 % liquid metal .
NaK is a liquid metal , but it's very volatile in presence of steam/humidity/water , but it's used for industrial cooling fans , in closed environments .
i know there are gallium based alloys used for cooling (like nuclear reactors) or used in thermostats , but usually liquid metal is corrosive , and there are few metals that can withstand it ... so i doubt it has a direct application for computers .
for example , 1 " lucky " drop on the MB and it can corrode the MB and destroy circuits inside it , or short-circuit stuff on the surface of it .

you sure of what you're saying ? i need a link pls

as for thermal paste/compound ... i think it's safer , if someone is not using a metal-based compound (silicon and ceramic are the safest) .
for example Arctic Silver Céramique . i know i was using that a long time ago when i had a desktop, not sure it's still on the market . will check out the Gelid GC out of curiosity .

It's 100% metal, I know what I meant. I've used it and it's fantastic, just gotta be careful at certain times, especially on a gpu die. I'm using it on my delidded cpu. I was using it between the die and ihs and ihs and waterblock, but ran out cleaning my loop out and used gelid extreme which worked just as good.

I'd attach a pic but apparently I'm not cool anymore.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/thermal-paste-performance-benchmark,3616.html


The graph... http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/thermal-paste-performance-benchmark,3616-20.html

tappin from the neXus 5
 
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yea man , but you said its LIQUID metal ... :rolleyes:
i'm reading the tom's hardware post , it's interesting , you gave me something to read and research for tonight . thanx
as for " the liquid " :
presuming this " liquid " metal thing is this pad that tom's hardware is praising ,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZctyucIouU ,
well if the metal would melt and become liquid , it would simply flow away from the CPU/GPU since it's heated up by it, so the metal would be likely to melt out of the socket or through the socket ... if you know where i'm pointing .
so my guess is that its not liquid metal in a chemistry/physics sense , but rather something else and/or a marketing thing
regarding how corrosive a liquid metal is , have a look here :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHHI2Lk79cY

after doing some research , this is what i have found :
The Coollaboratory Liquid MetalPad consists of only metal and no non-metallic additives.
The situation when the Liquid MetalPad changes’ (melting) is at approximately 58°C from solid to liquid.
When you are using the revolutionary Liquid MetalPad , it has to melt only once with a “BurnIn” process to achieve full performance.


Melting point of Gallium is 302.9146 K, 29.7646 °C, 85.5763 °F
so my guess is that Gallium is mixed with Indium maybe and something else , that allows the metal to become soft/squishy ... but it won't melt away , also , that something else aka another metal , will not allow the gallium to react with other metals and/or materials around it and to corrode stuff.
example to make you understand what i'm saying : some time ago , dentists used to use toot fillings that were greyish .
they were made from quicksilver/mercury , which is liquid at the room temperature . but this mercury mixed with silver and tin , makes an amalgam that is pretty strong , easy to work with , and not toxic at all (since mercury is very toxic).

coming back to your thing , i must say , that the idea is pretty ingenious !
very interesting !